TEDxLondonBusinessSchool | Estelle Lovatt: ‘The fun and irony in art‘ (Video)

This video was posted live during TEDxLBS 2016 from TEDx.

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Estelle Lovatt on BBC Radio London with Nikki Bedi | April 2018

Art Critic Estelle Lovatt FRSA talks to Nikki Bedi on BBC Radio London.
Round up of the London art scene highlights include:

Monet & Architecture, National Gallery, Includes paintings of London across the Thames, painted when Monet stayed at The Savoy hotel

Degas: Drawn in Colour, National Gallery. On loan from the Burrell Collection, Glasgow, Scotland

Anthea Hamilton: The Squash, Tate Britain. Performance Art with Sculpture from the 2016 Turner Prize nominee with her giant bottom, Tate Britain

Charles II: Art & Power, Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace. The Royal Collection includes Italian Renaissance and Dutch Golden Age masterpieces

Estelle Lovatt on BBC Radio London with Nikki Bedi | February 2018

Art Critic Estelle Lovatt FRSA talks to Nikki Bedi on BBC Radio London.

Round up of the London art scene highlights include Charles I: King & Collector, Royal Academy, in conjunction with BBC 4 TV ‘The Royal Collection’ programme, and book ‘Art, Passion and Power; The Story of the Royal Collection’.
The terrific fun Rose Wylie at Serpentine Gallery.  Andreas Gursky photographs, at the newly-refurbished just reopened beautiful ‘Brutalist’ Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre.  And The Queen of Pop, Bridget Riley, with her amazing Op art paintings at David Zwirner Mayfair W1.

Broadcast: Sun 11 Feb 2018 on BBC Radio London, with Nikki Bedi.

Estelle Lovatt on BBC Radio 4 | Taking a loo break to celebrate Duchamp’s ‘Fountain’ Centenary

Is this art?

It is the centenary of Duchamp’s The Fountain, the already-made, or “ready-made”, urinal, which launched the 20th century’s controversial obsession with conceptual art.

Art critic Estelle Lovatt and art historian Glynn Thompson discuss the story behind the piece and whether or not it should be considered a work of art.

(Image: The Fountain. Credit: Getty Images)

Broadcast: Sat 8 Apr 2017 on BBC Radio 4

The Royal Academy in London Marks 100th Anniversary of Russian Revolution | Video

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A momentous period in Russian history is on show in an exhibition at The Royal Academy in London.

The works of a variety of artists remember events 100 years ago and the Russian Revolution which dismantled the Tsarist autocracy and led to the eventual rise of the Soviet Union.

The exhibition ‘Revolution: Russian Art 1917 – 1932’ is a journey through that period captured by a variety of artists, photographers and sculptors of the time.

“This encapsulates a certain period in Russia that you just don’t get from textbooks. There’s nothing more powerful than the artist painting what’s going on in the world around him and the fact that artists are seen to be as powerful as soldiers, with their paintbrush using a visual type of propaganda, especially when most of the population were illiterate. It’s through the visual arts that a message is passed,” said Estelle Lovatt, art critic.

The exhibition explores the complex interaction between art and politics and how the state influenced artists.

It’s a unique look at Russian art from a period where new proletarian art for the Soviet state was encouraged until Stalin’s brutal crackdown and suppression in 1932.

The exhibition also features well known avant garde artists such as Vasily Kandinsky, Kazimir Malevich and Lyubov Popova.

It was a movement which was opposed by artists who were convinced art had to serve the revolution.

“There’s a group called the association of Russian revolutionary artists who were villianously determined to kill off the avant garde, insults, all kinds of fierce, ferocious criticism and they became more powerful as the 20’s went on and became a source of Socialist Realism.

‘And they argued very strongly that people needed to be able to understand the art, ordinary people, people on the bus needed to be able to know what on earth it was all about and they couldn’t do that with Popova or Kandinsky not surprisingly,” opined John Milner, Curator and Professor of Russian art history at the Courtauld Institute of Art.

Also woven through the galleries are original films, photographs and documents. The exhibition runs until mid April.

Source: EuroNews | WATCH VIDEO