Come and Meet Estelle Lovatt ‘Art Expert in Residence’ at Mall Gallery

15 February 2019, from 12:00pm to 1:30pm, join me at the Mall Gallery  where I’ll be ‘Art Expert in Residence’ and discuss work in The Pastel Society Annual Exhibition, ideas around art making, get art market insights and ask your questions on all things art!

I  will be based in the Main Gallery space and you can drop in anytime between 12 noon and 1.30pm.

The Mall, St. James’s, London SW1Y 5AH

“Art Critic Estelle Lovatt FRSA has the experience of being on both sides of the canvas; having trained as a painter, read art history and as a gallery exhibition curator, Estelle is able to teach, judge and talk about works of art, from Cave Art to Banksy, with expert opinion.

Estelle Lovatt is a freelance art critic on BBC TV and radio; Front Row and Today programmes, SKY News, CNN International, Al Jazeera. She writes art exhibition catalogues, including Henry Moore at Work, Serenity Halcyon Gallery & The Royal Parks, London, Jane McAdam Freud, Deborah Azzopardi, Kelvin Okafor, McAlpine Miller and more.

Estelle has also collaborated with The Reduced Shakespeare Company, writing the Reduced History of Art skit. From her TED Talk, The Fun & Irony in Art, to features in Artists and Illustrators magazine, Estelle is the art expert to read and hear. She’s also an art prize judge including the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, The Sunny Dupree Family Award and Female Artist Prize. And she teaches and lectures at the Hampstead School of Art, London.”

 

Estelle Lovatt: Art Expert in Residence at Mall Gallery, London

What did our ‘Art Expert in Residence’ Estelle Lovatt think of her first Mall Galleries residency day?

I was thrilled to be ‘Art Expert in Residence’ at the FBA Futures 2019 Exhibition. I also wasn’t sure what to expect, as total strangers were invited to join me at my table in the Mall Galleries café, to discuss any question about art, from the exhibition itself, through to ideas around art making, and art market insights.

As a freelance art critic, who has trained as a fine artist, I have the experience of being on both sides of the canvas, but not both sides of the table. Sitting at my designated table, I wondered whether I would feel like I was speed-dating for an art chat. Or be more like Marina Abramovic at her performance ‘The Artist Is Present’.

My table became a place for gallery-goers to rest their feet and eyes, whilst talking ‘art’ with me.  I heard lovely comments from people who said how much they liked the exhibition: ‘it’s getting better and better…firing on all cylinders…interesting…impressive’!  Several exchanges were very short – a few seconds, but still interesting, some chatted for minutes, others longer.

One of the exhibiting artists, Keron Beattie, who had impressed me with his lead and glass figures, came to chat with his friends.  We talked with a primary school teacher about what scale is the right scale to make art, as Beattie’s settles at 6 cms. Another visitor dropped by my table for a chinwag, whilst waiting to go to the talk that was taking place alongside the exhibition.  He thought the art ‘looked so vibrant’.

Me and my newly-made art-talking-table-friends created a ‘community’ in which to engage, schmooze and widen our understanding, appreciation and tolerance of our art world.

There were no boring conversations, and it was great to talk about art from the Renaissance to the YBAs – both giving guidance specifically on the individual’s career or work, or more generally the wider subject minus toffee-nosed art-world gobbledygook, often heard, talking about contemporary art and the role of the artist today.

Next time you see me at my table, please do come and join me.”

Source: https://www.mallgalleries.org.uk/about-us/blog/estelle-lovatt-art-expert-residence

 

Estelle Lovatt on BBC Radio London with Nikki Bedi | April 2018

Art Critic Estelle Lovatt FRSA talks to Nikki Bedi on BBC Radio London.
Round up of the London art scene highlights include:

Monet & Architecture, National Gallery, Includes paintings of London across the Thames, painted when Monet stayed at The Savoy hotel

Degas: Drawn in Colour, National Gallery. On loan from the Burrell Collection, Glasgow, Scotland

Anthea Hamilton: The Squash, Tate Britain. Performance Art with Sculpture from the 2016 Turner Prize nominee with her giant bottom, Tate Britain

Charles II: Art & Power, Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace. The Royal Collection includes Italian Renaissance and Dutch Golden Age masterpieces

The Royal Academy in London Marks 100th Anniversary of Russian Revolution | Video

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A momentous period in Russian history is on show in an exhibition at The Royal Academy in London.

The works of a variety of artists remember events 100 years ago and the Russian Revolution which dismantled the Tsarist autocracy and led to the eventual rise of the Soviet Union.

The exhibition ‘Revolution: Russian Art 1917 – 1932’ is a journey through that period captured by a variety of artists, photographers and sculptors of the time.

“This encapsulates a certain period in Russia that you just don’t get from textbooks. There’s nothing more powerful than the artist painting what’s going on in the world around him and the fact that artists are seen to be as powerful as soldiers, with their paintbrush using a visual type of propaganda, especially when most of the population were illiterate. It’s through the visual arts that a message is passed,” said Estelle Lovatt, art critic.

The exhibition explores the complex interaction between art and politics and how the state influenced artists.

It’s a unique look at Russian art from a period where new proletarian art for the Soviet state was encouraged until Stalin’s brutal crackdown and suppression in 1932.

The exhibition also features well known avant garde artists such as Vasily Kandinsky, Kazimir Malevich and Lyubov Popova.

It was a movement which was opposed by artists who were convinced art had to serve the revolution.

“There’s a group called the association of Russian revolutionary artists who were villianously determined to kill off the avant garde, insults, all kinds of fierce, ferocious criticism and they became more powerful as the 20’s went on and became a source of Socialist Realism.

‘And they argued very strongly that people needed to be able to understand the art, ordinary people, people on the bus needed to be able to know what on earth it was all about and they couldn’t do that with Popova or Kandinsky not surprisingly,” opined John Milner, Curator and Professor of Russian art history at the Courtauld Institute of Art.

Also woven through the galleries are original films, photographs and documents. The exhibition runs until mid April.

Source: EuroNews | WATCH VIDEO

David Hockney Retrospective at The Tate Breaks Records | Video

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It is the fastest-selling exhibition in the history of Britain’s Tate Gallery. Over 20,000 advance tickets have been sold for the David Hockney retrospective.

The artist is an innovator whose 60-year career has taken in sketching, painting, printmaking, photography and digital iPad experiments.

His depictions of sun-dappled Los Angeles swimming pools and wooded Yorkshire hills are among the best-known images in contemporary art.

“The exhibition, it has a focus, an emphasis, which is on the way throughout his mature career Hockney has really interrogated what it is to make pictures, why make pictures, how do you capture the real world of time and movement in something flat and static,” said Chris Stephens, curator of the exhibition.

The works in the exhibition begin in 1960 when the artist had just arrived at London’s Royal College of Art and takes in ’50’s abstraction.

From then on it develops and features Hockney through different periods which explore how you engage with the world, how you describe the world in pictures while also sparking a debate about what art is.

david_hockney

“He just uses the canvas. He uses color, he uses the camera, he uses film in the most exceptional and unimaginable ways and he has this great imagination and this great power to put on 2D what is actually 3D and he confuses us and he plays with us and he cajoles with us,” opined Estelle Lovatt, art critic.

The 79-year-old who once said, “art has to move you and design does not, unless it’s a good design for a bus” still paints.

He has always documented the places and people around him, his pictures act almost as a diary for his life. The artist described revisiting his works for the retrospective as like encountering old friends.

The exhibition runs to May 29 after which it will move to the Pompidou Centre in Paris from the end of June to October. It goes across the Atlantic to New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art from November to February.

 

Source: Euro News | WATCH VIDEO